6814 Bethany Lane, Valley Station, KY: The Aydelott-Rosenberger House

A funny thing happened after a visit to Riverside, The Farnsely-Moreman Landing house one day.

The historic home built on the Ohio River and now owned by the city of Louisville as one in a string of parks was impressive enough, masterfully restored and cared for by the employees and volunteers at the park.  But once I headed home and started looking into the history of this well-preserved old mansion, I quickly came to realize I had missed another house that, though it was very near by, was in a different state of preservation entirely.

It was a few months later until I once again found myself once again at Riverside, determined to find the Aydelott-Rosenberger house, which lay a little ways off the beaten path.  And after following a familiar trail that led down a shady old country lane to a suspiciously quiet clearing, I managed to find it.

This shady lane (stagnant pond to the left) leads to the old Aydelott-Rosenberger house.  Along the way, there are remnants of several other out-buildings, the foundations and sometimes building materials of which are still visible along the path.
This shady lane (stagnant pond to the left) leads to the old Aydelott-Rosenberger house. Along the way, there are remnants of several other out-buildings, the foundations and sometimes building materials of which are still visible along the path.
The first sign that I was getting close!
The first sign that I was getting close!
The back of the Aydelott-Rosenberger house.
The back of the Aydelott-Rosenberger house.
Interpretive sign sitting against the old whitewashed brick.
Interpretive sign sitting against the old whitewashed brick.
Broken steps--first evidence of the state of disrepair that had befallen this once grand riverside home.
Broken steps–first evidence of the state of disrepair that had befallen this once grand riverside home.
More evidence of this crumbling antique's neglect.
More evidence of this crumbling antique’s neglect.
Back of the house, looking up.
Back of the house, looking up.
Right side of the house with the right side of the front porch visible.
Right side of the house with the right side of the front porch visible.
Front porch/right side.
Front porch/right side.  Per several sources, the trees and brush in front of the house used to be cleared back when the home was routinely in habited, leaving a nice, open view of the river that runs in front of this old home.
View of the front porch and the original front door.  Note the detailed woodwork around the door and the graffiti at close proximity to the original workmanship.
View of the front porch and the original front door. Note the detailed woodwork around the door and the graffiti at close proximity to the original workmanship.
Windows to the right of the front door.
Windows to the right of the front door.
Left front of the house, featuring a nice bay window with impressive brick detailing.
Left front of the house, featuring a nice bay window with impressive brick detailing.
Left front, looking across the front of the house toward the porch.
Left front, looking across the front of the house toward the porch.

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Full view of the bay window on the left side of the house.
Full view of the bay window on the left side of the house.

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Another view of the back of the house.
Another view of the back of the house.
Massive old tree in the back yard, probably has been there as long as the house.  Ripe for a treehouse or tire swing!
Massive old tree in the back yard, probably has been there as long as the house. Ripe for a treehouse or tire swing!
Old barn silo, likely a remnant from the original owners.
Old barn silo, likely a remnant from the original owners.
Historic chapel visible from the house's backyard.
Historic chapel visible from the house’s backyard.
Back of the house through the brush.  Summertime hides this historic home very nicely.
Back of the house through the brush. Summertime hides this historic home very nicely.
What is very likely an original farm windpump from when the house was built.
What is very likely an original farm windpump from when the house was built.
Walking back to the chapel path from the house.
Walking back to the chapel path from the house.

Check out the history of the house and the family that built it in my next post, linked below.  Don’t miss the old photos!

https://thewaywardwanderlust.wordpress.com/2015/03/04/the-aydelott-family-history/

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3 thoughts on “6814 Bethany Lane, Valley Station, KY: The Aydelott-Rosenberger House

  1. Some parts of the house were said to date to 1790’s, but that was the part the county took down. If you look on the east side of the house, you will see the mortar between the bricks were not trilled off, which would indicate that the brick part of the house was built up against another building that was already there. It was also rumored to have been used to help runaway slaves on their way to freedom. the only roads into the house and the Moorman house both came from Dixie, so there would be time for the slaves to move between the houses depending on which house the hunters would be looking for them at.

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